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  • #10759
    JM
    (admin)

    Our Dialect Report from 1962 (see it at https://devonassoc.org.uk/dvp62 – scroll down below the map) contains an interesting twist on the Devon vs. Cornwall, jam or cream first debate.
    To quote:
    “In South Devon the correct way to serve a chudley is to butter it, then use jam with a thick layer of cream on top. In North Devon the jam is placed on top of the cream.”

    #10772
    MontyP
    Participant

    This certainly accords with my experience as a child coming from Holsworthy – which I guess you could call North Devon. The ‘butter’ was the cream with the jam on top.

    #10838
    Wistman
    Participant

    If you went into a cafe now and asked for a chudley, a tuff, or a cut-round, they wouldn’t know what you were talking about. I wonder when the change to the now ubiquitous scone took place?

    #11238
    JohnBB
    Participant

    I worked as a waiter in the Thatched Barn cafe in Croyde during my university summer vacations in 1966 and 1967, and I am fairly sure that the standard ‘Devon cream tea’ we offered then comprised scones and not cut-rounds. I wonder, was it that our market was tourists from well beyond Devon that caused scones to be offered and not the cut-rounds that I remembered from my childhood in the 1950s? If you pressed me, then I would put the change at around 1960. As point of interest, some of our customers were shocked that there was no butter on the tray we brought to the table!

    #11569
    MontyP
    Participant

    Looking at the Murray Laver Devonshire Dialect Word Index I have found two references so far to the buns used for Devon team teas.
    1. nubbies = saffron buns or the plain bread-buns eaten with cream and jam
    2. hapuny buns = plain buns eaten with cream and jam

    #11683
    Collegiate
    Participant

    A different slant on this – I was watching Julia Bradley’s walks the other day and she was in North Devon. She enjoyed a cream tea and was told that whortleberry jam was traditionally served with the scones and cream in North Devon. In South Devon I’ve only been served strawberry jam (which I’m not very fond of). So on Friday, June 27th (National Cream Tea Day) I baked some scones (sorry!) and bought some whortleberry jam – and it is much better than strawberry jam!!!

    #11684
    Chapelhill
    Participant

    Pardon my ignorance, but what’s the difference between a whortleberry and a bilberry, please?

    #11698
    Chapelhill
    Participant

    None at all I discover!

    #11712
    Wistman
    Participant

    It used to be said that a pie baked from “wurts” that you had collected yourself from the moor tasted better than one made from shop-bought bilberries because you would always accidentally pick up a couple of sheep droppings too. A bit like the dead rat in scrumpy thing.

    #12107
    MontyP
    Participant

    I’ve found another Dialect name for scones in the Murray Laver Devonshire Dialect Word Index –

    nobbies = the plain bread buns eaten with cream and jam

    This entry is followed by –

    Nobby = 1. A small raisin bun or cake
    2. A pet name to call a young colt

    #12131
    JM
    (admin)

    ‘Nobbies’ would seem to be a variant of ‘nubbie’ which was shown in the 1962 report as only recorded in Lydford. Does ML say from where ‘nobbies’ was collected?

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